Reports

 

Report on EAEH2017, October 26-30, Tianjin, China
By Ts’ui-jung Liu, Academia Sinica. Date: November 2, 2017.

The Association for East Asian Environmental History (AEAEH) had its biennial conference, The Forth Conference of East Asian Environmental History, held from October 26 to 30 at Nankai University, Tianjin.

The first day, October 26, was the day for check-in.

The second day, October 27, started with the Opening Ceremony chaired by Professor Lihua Wang 王利华, the president of the AEAEH, followed by welcome address by Ke Gong 龚克, the President of Nankai University, and a speech by Xinyuan Lu 陆新元, Vice-president of Chinese society of Environmental Sciences. After taking the group photo, there were two keynote speeches. First, Yuqing Wang 王玉庆 delivered a speech on “Ecological Civilization: Our Thinking and Action”, and second, Donald Worster presented a speech on “Rim and Chasm: Down the Trial to a Larger Sense of History”. In the afternoon, there were two parallel sessions each consisted of six parts. Together, 47 papers were presented. In the evening, there was a multidisciplinary communication on the theme of food and environment in history Organized by Wang Lihua and chaired by Siming Wang and Micah Muscolino.

The third day, October 28, in the morning there were three keynote speeches. First , TaoHu胡涛, delivered a speech on “Environmental Impacts of Industrialization: Historic Perspective”; following the speech was a detailed comment by Robert Mark. Second, Ts’ui-jung Liu 劉翠溶 gave a speech on “Practices of Energy Saving and Emission Reduction in Coastal Southeast Mainland China and Taiwan”; following the speech Yixin Zhang 張一心 gave a brief comment. Third, Daniel Guttman delivered a speech on “Comparative Environmental History in the Making: the Rapid Development of Environmental Law and Policy in China and the U.S.”; following the speech, Jian Ke 柯坚 gave a detailed comment. It should be noted that originally Professor J. Donald Hughes was to deliver a keynote speech on “The Anthropocene in Environmental History, East and West: Human Evidence Versus Nature’s Power”, but he got sick in the first day and thus was not able to give his speech as scheduled. In the afternoon, there were two parallel sessions each consisted of six parts. Together, 46 papers were presented. In the evening, there was a multidisciplinary communication on the theme of localizing the Anthropocene organized by Cameron Muir and chaired by Lisa M. Brady.

The fourth day, October 29, there was a mid-conference study tour. Participants were guided to visit a modern scientific green-house at Shuigao Zhuang 水高庄, an excursion on the Haihe River 海河, and Tianjin central city.

The fifth day, October 30, there were two parallel sessions in the morning; the first one included six parallel parts and the second one included five parts. Together, 38 papers were presented. In the afternoon, in addition to round table of council members, there was the general meeting for the participants of AEAEH members. The task of the general meeting was to elect the new President and the new Council Members. The new President of AEAEH elected is Shiyung Liu 劉士永 and the new Council Members elected are Robert Mark, Tatsushi Fujihara 藤原辰史, Xinzhong Yu 余新忠, Manyong Moon 文晚龍, Shen Hou 侯深, Yongjian Hou 侯甬坚, Hurng-Jyuhn Wang 王鴻濬, Akihisa Setoguchi 瀨戶口明久. In the evening, a banquet was hold at the dining hall of Expert Apartment of Nankai University.

 

Report on the 2017 Third Environmental History Workshop
By Ya-wen Ku, Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica

The third workshop of environmental history in 2017 was held at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica on Sep. 15. There were four presentations at this workshop: two research reports and two reading reports.

Dr. Szu-Wei Tsai蔡思薇, the post-doctoral fellow of the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica, presented the first paper. She discussed the scientific practice of botany during the Meiji-period in colonial Taiwan, and explored the relationship between science and empire.

Dr. Er-jian Yeh葉爾建, Assistant Professor of National Dong Hwa University, gave the second report. He examined the historical process and geographic change of the activities of Chinese merchants during the American Colonial Period in the Philippines, especially focusing on the relationship between their economic activities and environment.

Dr. Ts’ui-jung Liu 劉翠溶 of the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica, presented the first reading report on Ulrich Beck’sThe Metamorphosis of the World (UK: Polity Press, 2016), discussing how climate change is transforming our concept of the world.

Dr. Shu-Min Huang黃樹民, Hou Chin-tui Chair Professor & Director of the Institute of Anthropology, National Tsing Hua University, gave another reading report on Emily T. Yeh’s Taming Tibet: Landscape Transformation and the Gift of Chinese Development (Cornell University Press, 2013), which revealed how the Chinese government consolidated state space and power in Tibet through several development projects.

 

Report on 2017 EH Workshop (2)-2017/6/16
Reported by
Ya-wen Ku (Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica) and
Marlon Zhu (Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica)

The second workshop of environmental history in 2017 was held at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia SInica on June 16. There were four presentations at this workshop: three research reports and one reading report.

Dr. Su-Bing Chang (張素玢), professor of the Graduate Institute of Taiwan History, National Taiwan Normal University, gave a report on her study of Chukou River (濁口溪) meandering among the treacherous mountains in the south Taiwan. She pointed out that, between 1903 and the 1930s, the specific environmental characteristics of the Chukou valley, such as those of topography, geology, and hydrography, helped the local indigenous to fight against Japanese invasion. The Japanese were enhanced with modern weaponry but less efficient in that area. It was why the local indigenous people, the Wan-Dou-Longs (萬斗籠社), became the last one in Taiwan to succumb to the Japanese rule.

Dr. Pin-Tsang Tseng (曾品滄) of the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica, presented his study on “A social history of a lake: water use and social conflicts surrounding Ho-Pao-Yu Lake(荷苞嶼大潭) during Qing Dynasty.” He discussed the evolution of the political economy of the Lake when it was shrinking during the Qing period. The partial propriety right of the Tax-farming households of the Lake (港戶的不完全業主權) had caused series of conflicts among them and the nearby farmers who legally irrigated their fields with water from the Lake. These enduring conflicts had formed identities of various local communities.

Dr. Hurng-Jyuhn Wang (王鴻濬), Dean to the School of Humanities and Social Science, National Donghwa University, gave the third research report on “the Comparing perspectives on the Ecological Civilization.” Focusing on the ideas regarding human and nature under different cultures of the East and the West, and the difference of such ideas between philosophers and scientists, Wang proposes a new synthesis of environmental ethics in order to consolidate the ecological civilization.

Dr. Chung-Hao Pio Kuo (郭忠豪), Project Assistant Research Fellow of the College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, gave a book review on Gregory M. Pflugfelder & Brett L. Walker’s JAPANimals: History and Culture in Japan's Animal Life (Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press, 2005). This is an essay collection introducing the edge-cutting animal studies in Japan. Interactions between Japanese and animals, such as deer, snakes, birds, boars, dogs, insects, and whales, as well as zoology, were examined respectively in each chapter.

 

2017EHWorkshop-2017/03/17
Report by Ya-wen Ku, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica

The first workshop of environmental history in 2017 was held at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica on March 17. Three research reports and one reading report were presented.

Prof. Shao-li Lu (呂紹理), Professor of the Department of History, National Taiwan University, gave a research report on “The Agricultural Experiment Stations in Taiwan during the Japanese Colonial Period (日治時期臺灣農試試驗場: 資源交換與控制的平台)”. Basing on the re-examination of the concept of “biologie (biology)” in the 19th century, his paper argued that the agricultural experiment stations established in colonial Taiwan were served as platforms of resource exchange and control.

Dr. Ts’ui-jung Liu (劉翠溶), Adjunct Research Fellow of the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica, presented preliminary research work entitled “From a Fertilizer Factory to a Business Park: A Site of Industrial Archaeology Located at Nangang District, Taipei City”. She investigated how the Nangang District in Taipei City has been transformed from a “black country” with many factories producing various industrial goods such as flour, tire and fertilizer to a business and software park in the recent decades. She also examined the effect of development on population, economy and environment.

In the afternoon, Ms. Liang-yu Yep (葉梁羽), a graduate student of master degree at the School of Forestry and Resource Conservation, National Taiwan University, gave the third research report on “The Paradigm of the Wetland Conservation Act (混地保育法的典範分析)”. She discussed the history of the conservation area policies, and argued that the Wetland Conservation Act expresses a new paradigm.

Finally, Dr. Tsui-jung Liu (劉翠溶) gave a reading report of the book written by Anna Storm, Post-Industrial Landscape Scars (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). This book included seven chapters: 1 Introduction, 2 Unstable Mountain, 3 Distance of Fear, 4 Lost Utopia, 5 Industrial Nature, 6 Enduring Spirit, and 7 Prospective Scars Unfolding. Liu’s report was mainly focused on Chapters 1 and 7. The geographical setting of this book is the Baltic Sea Region of Northern Europe. The places focused are Malmberget, a mining town in Sweden; Barsebäck, a commercial nuclear power plant in Denmark; Ignalina, another nuclear power plant; the Ruhr industrial area in Germany; and Avesta, a company town in Sweden.

 

Report on 2016 EH Workshop (4)
By Ya-wen Ku 顧雅文, Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica

The fourth workshop of environmental history in 2016 was held at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica on Nov. 18 and three reports were presented.

Dr. Shu-Min Huang黃樹民, Hou Chin-tui Chair Professor & Director of the Institute of Anthropology, National Tsing Hua University, gave a book review on Judith Shapiro’s China’s Environmental Challenges (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2012). Based on long-term observation of China, Shapiro showed the rapid economic development and serious environmental deterioration after the reform and open policy in the late 1970s. Shapiro argued that many western researchers have simplified the causes of China’s environmental problems, which are in fact more complicated than expected. This book provided five key analytical concepts, including globalization, governance, national identity, civil society, and environmental justice.

Dr. Ya-Wen Ku 顧雅文, Assistant Research Fellow of the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica, presented the second report titled ‘Medical History from a Perspective of Environmental History’, a paper included in a handbook of the history of medicine which will be published next year. By analyzing existing literatures, she illustrated how the medical and disease issues have been integrated into the study of the environmental history, and argued how the environmental issues have provided different perspectives on the study of medical history.

Dr. Tsuo-Ming Hsu 徐佐銘, Associate Professor of the Center for General Education and Core Curriculum, Tamkang University, gave a research report on “Rachel Carson’s three books about the Ocean”, by analyzing Carson’s Under the Sea WindThe Sea Around Us and The Edge of the Sea from a philosophical Perspective.

Finally, the chair of this workshop, Dr. Tsui-jung Liu 劉翠溶, announced that The Fourth Conference of East Asian Environmental History (EAEH 2017) will be held from October 27-30, 2017 in Tianjin, China, and encouraged all members to join in.

 

Report on 2016 EH Workshop (3)
By Ya-wen Ku 顧雅文, Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica

The third workshop of environmental history in 2016 was held at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica on August 19. There were one research report and three reading reports.

Dr. Chia-San Shen沈佳姍, Assistant Professor of the Department of Liberal Arts, National Open University, presented her working paper on the livestock management under Japanese Colonial Period. She reviewed the Taiwanese traditional way of taking care of livestock health, and traced the establishment of animal quarantine system and related training system for technicians in the colonial period. The purpose of this study is to illustrate the modernization of livestock management as well as the subsequent influences.

Dr. Marlon Zhu 朱瑪瓏, Assistant Research Fellow of the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, gave his reading report on Empires of Coal: Fueling China’s Entry into the Modern World Order, 1860-1920 by Shellen Xiao Wu 吳曉 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2015). The book contains six chapters. He focused on discussing chapters two to four, which illustrate how the Western scientists, missionaries and engineers investigated coal resource in China, and introduced modern geology in the late Qing. In the process, coal was reconceptualized, from just a commodity to be taxed, to a most important fuel which was the key factor for China’s wealth and power.

Dr. Pin-tsang Tseng 曾品滄, Associate Research Fellow of the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica, introduced a Japanese monograph titled稲の大東亜共栄圏:帝国日本の緑の革命 by Fujihara Tatsushi 藤原辰史 (東京: 吉川弘文館, 2012). The book discusses the history of the breeding for high-yield rice in Japanese Empire, including inland Japan, colonial Korea and Taiwan. Dr. Tseng suggested that the development of breeding technology in Taiwan deserves more attention than historians usually gave it, for it had played an important role in East Asia or even in the world. He also introduced the history of agriculture has been “reborn” in recent years by new research approaches, such as combining the viewpoint from the study of food history or environmental history. This book could be seen as one of the best example.

Dr. Paul Jobin 彭保羅, Associate Research Fellow of the Institute Sociology, Academia Sinica, gave the last reading report on L'évènement anthropocène by Christophe Bonneuil and Jean-Baptiste Fressoz (Paris: Seuil, 2013). Written by a historian of science and a historian of environment, this book received great noticed especially in the field of STS research. The authors argue that the concept of "Anthropocene" proposed by some scientists was Western-centered and too simplified. This book thus suggests a more thorough investigation into the history of the human impact on the earth.

 

Report on 2016 EHWorkshop (2) held on 20 May 2016 at Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sincia
By Ya-wen Ku, Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History

Dr. Kuan-Hui Elaine Lin (林冠慧), Post-doctoral Fellow of the Center for Sustainability Science at Academia Sinica, gave her research report on the “Spatial-temporal analysis on climate variation in early Qing dynasty (17th-18th century): Using China’s chronological records.” The report is based on a three-year multidisciplinary research project conducted by Academia Sinica. Dr. Lin introduced the work of the project and the database. She made an initial analysis of the flood damages in Qing dynasty on the basis of what have accomplished at the first year.

Prof. Hurng-jyuhn Wang (王鴻濬) of the Department of Public Administration, National Donghwa University, gave the second report, “Endless discovery: A century history of forestry in Haron.” Prof. Wang traced the exploitation of Taiwan’s forest since the late nineteenth century and focused his discussion on the forestry in Haron, which could represent Taiwan’s forestry. By examining the case of Haron, Prof. Wang pointed out forest management in Taiwan achieved modernization under the rules of Japanese imperial government and National government. Along with the social development in Taiwan, the forestry policy changed in the past hundred years. After World War II, Haron forestry had been run under Hualian County for 12 years, which brought enormous influence over local development. Through thorough examination of government documents, newspapers, magazines, journals and interviews with officers, workers, businessman and scholars, Prof. Wang brought insight into a history of Taiwan’s forestry.

Dr. Shi-yung Liu (劉士永) of the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica, presented the third report. He gave a book review onEffects of Ecosystems on Disease and of Disease on Ecosystems (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2010), edited by Richard S. Ostfeld, Felicia Keesing, and Valerie T. Eviner. Dr. Liu pointed out the main argument of the book was that we all as humans stay at the parasites’ place which in turn reside in us. Vector-parasite interactions need reconsiderations in two ways: (1) Parasites may adapt on multiple vector species en route for transmission and vectors may support multiple pathogens. (2) Parasites are not killers, not at the center of Earth ecosystems organization, but constitute an important component of biological diversity and organization. New ideas and theories was brought as well, including development of adequate models to deal with complex systems, extension of the Red Queen hypothesis at a community-scale level, and resilience theory to socioecological systems.

Dr. Chunghao Pio Kuo (郭忠豪), Visiting Assistant Professor of University of Illinois University at Urbana-Champaign, introduced E. N. Anderson’s Food and Environment in Early and Medieval China (Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014). Dr. Kuo introduced the book with food system theory which could be applied to history interpretation, for instance, the Mongol Empire expansion or the Discovery of the New World. Anderson brought a new issue: what were the key factors of the successful food policy in Chinese history? Dr. Kuo pointed out that biological technology, agricultural policies, religion, and the worldview which value farming instead of commerce were the crucial elements Anderson suggested. However, Dr. Kuo added, certain materials were translated mistakenly thus cause some wrong historical interpretation.

 

Report on 2016 EHWorkshop (1) held on 18 March 2016 at Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica
Reported by
Marlon Zhu (Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History) and
Ya-wen Ku (Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History)

Dr. Der-Ching Horng (洪德欽), Research Fellow of the Institute of European and American Studies, Academia Sinica, gave a research report on “Constructing Food Safety Institutions in Taiwan: Model from EU.” Dr. Horng started with food safety incidences in Taiwan in recent years and introduced methods and regulations taken by EU in food safety, suggesting that these institutions might be useful to remedy food problems in Taiwan. These institutions include (1) establishing an independent European Food Safety Authority (ESFA, 歐盟食品安全局), which is responsible for risk assessment and the alleged policy making; (2) the European Union Reference Laboratories(EU-RLs, 歐盟食品安全實驗室); and (3) the food safety police (食安警察). Horng compared these with corresponding institutions in Taiwan, and offered proposals for reforming food laws for the authorities.

Mr. Ming-Kuang Chung (鍾明光), a PhD candidate of the Department of Geography, National Taiwan University, gave a research report on “Water Governance on Cho-shui River (濁水溪): with the approach of STS analysis.” Mr. Chung explored the history of this longest river in Taiwan from the 18th century, interpreting it with the Actor Network Theory (ANT) proposed by STS researchers. Interests of human and non-human actors, such as governments under different regimes, local residents, sugar cane refinery, agriculture, hydrology and engineering knowledge, embankment technique, methods and ideology of water resource management, all acted heterogeneously to shape the landscape along the River in different periods till the late 20th century.

Dr. Hsin-huang Michael Hsiao (蕭新煌), Distinguished Research Fellow of the Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica and his research team including Prof. Wen-ling Tu (杜文苓), Prof. Chun-chieh Chi (紀駿傑), Prof. Shih-Jung Hsu (徐世榮), Prof. Keng-ming Hsu (許耿銘) and Prof. Hsin-hsun Huang (黃信勳) gave an introduction of their book titled The Lessons of Taiwan’s Local Environment (Kaohsiung: Chu-Liu Book Company, 2015). The book showed how the central and local governments, in collusion with interest groups, have promoted the environmental degradation in Taiwan since the 1950s. They also indicated that the non-government social force has played a vital role in protecting our environment.

Dr. Ts’ui-jung Liu (劉翠溶) of the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica, gave a book review on Susannah Hagan’s Ecological Urbanism: the nature of the city (London and New York: Routledge, 2015), focusing on the content of Chap.1 and 6. In Chap. 1, the author traced the origins of the term “ecological urbanism” and tried to give it a definition. In Chap. 6, the author discussed the similarities and differences between the ideal city and the eco city.

 

Report on the Third Conference of East Asian Environmental History (EAEH2015)
by Shiyung Liu (Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica)

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Report on 2015 EHWorkshop (3), August 28, 2015
Ya-wen Ku (Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History) for the morning session and Pin-tsang Tseng (Assistant Research Fellow, Institute to Taiwan History) for the afternoon session.

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Report on 2015EHWorkshop (2), May 29, 2015
by Ts’ui-jung Liu, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica

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Report on the 2015 Environmental History Workshop (1) held at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica (2015/03/20)
By Pin-Tsang Tseng (Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica) for the morning section
and Ya-wen Ku (Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica) for the afternoon section

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Report on the 2014 Environmental History Workshop (4) held at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica (2014/11/21)
by Ts’ui-jung Liu, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica

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Report on the 2014 Environmental History Workshop (3) held at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica
by Ts’ui-jung Liu, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica (2014/09/01)

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Report on “Ethnic and Environmental Change in China’s Southwestern Frontier: A Global Perspective” International Academic Workshop, Yunnan University, 18-20 August, 2014
by Ts’ui-jung Liu, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica (2014/8/29)

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A Report on the Second World Congress of Environmental History (WCEH2014)
By Ts’ui-jung Liu, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica (July 24, 2014)

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Report on the Second 2014 EH Workshop at Academia Sinica (May 23, 2014)
by Marlon Zhu (Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica)

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Report on the First 2014 EH Workshop at Academia Sinica (February 21, 2014)
by Marlon Zhu (Post-doctoral Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica)

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Report on the Second Conference of East Asian Environmental History (EAEH2013)
by Ya-wen Ku and Marlon Zhu (Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica)

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Report on the Third 2013 EH Workshop at Academia Sinica (August 23, 2013)
by Marlon Zhu (Post-doctoral Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica)

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Report on the 2013 Second EH Workshop at Academia Sinica (May 24, 2013)
by Marlon Zhu (Post-doctoral Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica)

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Report on the 2013 First EH Workshop at Academia Sinica (February 22, 2013)
by Marlon Zhu (Post-doctoral Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica)

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Report on the 2012 forth EH Workshop at Academia Sinica (November 23, 2012)
By Ts’ui-jung Liu

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Report on the 2012 3rd EH Workshop at Academia Sinica (August 31, 2012)
by Marlon Zhu (Post-doctoral Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica)

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Brief on the speech at Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica (July 6,2012)

Lecturer: Professor Philip Brown (Department of History, The Ohio State University) CV
Topic: Technology Transfer in Early Twentieth-Century East Asia: Thoughts for a Comparative Research Project
  Abstract Powerpoint Slides

 

Report on the 2012 Second EH Workshop at Academia Sinica (May 25, 2012)
By Marlon Zhu (Ph.D. Candidate, The State University of New York at Binghamton)

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A Report on the 2012 First EH Workshop at Academia Sinica (February 24th, 2012)
By Marlon Zhu (PhD candidate of History Department, Binghamton University, SUNY)

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Report on the First Conference of East Asian Environmental History, 2011
By Marlon Zhu (Ph.D. Candidate, BinghamtonUniversity, SUNY; Assistant, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica)

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A Report on the Third EH Workshop of 2011 at Academia Sinica (July 22, 2011)
By Ya-wen Ku (Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica) and Marlon Zhu (PhD candidate of History Department, BinghamtonUniversity, SUNY)

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A Report on the Second EH Workshop of 2011 at Academia Sinica (May 20, 2011)
By Marlon Zhu (PhD candidate of History Department, Binghamton University, SUNY)

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A Report on the First EH Workshop of 2011 at Academia Sinica (February 18th, 2011)
By Marlon Zhu (PhD candidate of History Department, Binghamton University, SUNY)

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A report on the fourth EH workshop at Academia Sinica (October 29, 2010)
By Ts'ui-jung Liu

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Report on the Third EH Workshop at Academia Sinica (July 16, 2010)
By Yi-tze Lee, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh; Visiting fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica

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A brief report on the second workshop of environmental history held on April 30, 2010 at Academia Sinica
By Ts'ui-jung Liu

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A Repot on the First EH Workshop at Academia Sinica
By Yi-tze Lee, Dept. of Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh; Visiting fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica

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Brief on WCEH2009 by Ts'ui-jung Liu

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